Visualizing Women’s Economic Rights Around the World

Visualizing Women’s Economic Rights Around the World 1700

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Visualizing Women’s Economic Rights in Each Country

In recent years, many economies have made women’s rights a priority by eliminating job restrictions, working to reduce the gender wage gap, or changing legislation related to marriage and parenthood.

Still, many laws continue to inhibit women’s ability to enter the workforce or start a business—and even to travel outside their homes in the same way as men. In fact, on average globally, women have just three-quarters of the economic rights of men.

This map uses data from the Women, Business and Law 2021 report by the World Bank, to visualize women’s economic rights around the world.

Legal Protections

According to the World Bank, only 10 countries offer full legal protections to women, and all of them are in the Northern Hemisphere.

In ranking countries, the institution considers indicators like equal remuneration, legal rights, and mobility. A score of 100 means that women are on equal legal standing with men across all areas measured.

Rank Country/Territory Score
1 Belgium 100.0
1 Canada 100.0
1 Denmark 100.0
1 France 100.0
1 Iceland 100.0
1 Ireland 100.0
1 Latvia 100.0
1 Luxembourg 100.0
1 Portugal 100.0
1 Sweden 100.0
2 Estonia 97.5
2 Finland 97.5
2 Germany 97.5
2 Greece 97.5
2 Italy 97.5
2 Netherlands 97.5
2 New Zealand 97.5
2 Spain 97.5
2 United Kingdom 97.5
3 Australia 96.9
3 Austria 96.9
3 Hungary 96.9
3 Norway 96.9
3 Slovenia 96.9
4 Peru 95.0
5 Paraguay 94.4
6 Croatia 93.8
6 Czech Republic 93.8
6 Lithuania 93.8
6 Poland 93.8
6 Serbia 93.8
7 Kosovo 91.9
7 Mauritius 91.9
8 Albania 91.3
8 Cyprus 91.3
8 Taiwan, China 91.3
8 United States 91.3
9 Bulgaria 90.6
9 Romania 90.6
10 Ecuador 89.4
10 Hong Kong, China 89.4
11 Bolivia 88.8
11 El Salvador 88.8
11 Malta 88.8
11 Mexico 88.8
11 Uruguay 88.8
12 Lao PDR 88.1
12 Montenegro 88.1
12 South Africa 88.1
13 Guyana 86.9
13 Zimbabwe 86.9
14 Cabo Verde 86.3
14 Dominican Republic 86.3
14 Namibia 86.3
14 Nicaragua 86.3
14 São Tomé and Príncipe 86.3
15 Georgia 85.6
15 Switzerland 85.6
16 Bosnia and Herzegovina 85.0
16 Brazil 85.0
16 Korea, Rep. 85.0
16 North Macedonia 85.0
16 Slovak Republic 85.0
16 Venezuela 85.0
17 Moldova 84.4
17 Togo 84.4
18 Liberia 83.8
18 Puerto Rico (US) 83.8
18 St. Lucia 83.8
19 Costa Rica 83.1
19 Côte d’Ivoire 83.1
19 Timor-Leste 83.1
20 Armenia 82.5
20 Fiji 82.5
20 Mongolia 82.5
20 Mozambique 82.5
20 Singapore 82.5
20 Turkey 82.5
20 United Arab Emirates 82.5
21 Colombia 81.9
21 Japan 81.9
21 Vietnam 81.9
22 Bahamas 81.3
22 Tanzania 81.3
22 Zambia 81.3
23 Grenada 80.6
23 Israel 80.6
23 Kenya 80.6
23 Nepal 80.6
23 Rwanda 80.6
24 Chile 80.0
24 Samoa 80.0
24 San Marino 80.0
24 Saudi Arabia 80.0
25 Belize 79.4
25 Burkina Faso 79.4
25 Panama 79.4
25 Ukraine 79.4
26 Azerbaijan 78.8
26 Congo, Dem. Rep. 78.8
26 Kiribati 78.8
26 Philippines 78.8
26 Tajikistan 78.8
27 Lesotho 78.1
27 Thailand 78.1
28 Benin 77.5
28 Malawi 77.5
29 Barbados 76.9
29 Central African Republic 76.9
29 Ethiopia 76.9
29 Kyrgyz Republic 76.9
30 Argentina 76.3
30 Guinea 76.3
30 Seychelles 76.3
31 Belarus 75.6
31 China 75.6
31 Morocco 75.6
32 Cambodia 75.0
32 Ghana 75.0
32 Honduras 75.0
32 Trinidad and Tobago 75.0
33 Gambia 74.4
33 India 74.4
33 Madagascar 74.4
34 Maldives 73.8
34 Suriname 73.8
35 Angola 73.1
35 Burundi 73.1
35 Russia 73.1
35 Uganda 73.1
36 Bhutan 71.9
37 St. Kitts and Nevis 71.3
38 Guatemala 70.6
38 Uzbekistan 70.6
39 South Sudan 70.0
40 Eritrea 69.4
40 Kazakhstan 69.4
40 Sierra Leone 69.4
41 Dijibouti 68.1
41 Jamaica 68.1
41 Marshall Islands 68.1
41 St. Vicent and the Grenadines 68.1
42 Tunisia 67.5
43 Senegal 66.9
44 Antigua and Barbuda 66.3
44 Chad 66.3
45 Sri Lanka 65.6
46 Comoros 65.0
47 Indonesia 64.4
48 Botswana 63.8
48 Haiti 63.8
48 Micronesia 63.8
49 Nigeria 63.1
50 Dominica 62.5
51 Mali 60.6
52 Cameroon 60.0
52 Papua New Guinea 60.0
53 Niger 59.4
54 Myanmar 58.8
54 Palau 58.8
54 Tonga 58.8
55 Vanuatu 58.1
56 Algeria 57.5
56 Gabon 57.5
57 Solomon Islands 56.9
58 Bahrain 55.6
58 Pakistan 55.6
59 Brunei Darussalam 53.1
60 Lebanon 52.5
61 Equatorial Guinea 51.9
62 Libya 50.0
62 Malaysia 50.0
63 Bangladesh 49.4
63 Congo, Rep. 49.4
64 Mauritania 48.1
65 Jordan 46.9
65 Somalia 46.9
66 Eswatini 46.3
67 Egypt 45.0
67 Iraq 45.0
68 Guinea-Bissau 42.5
69 Afghanistan 38.1
70 Syria 36.9
71 Oman 35.6
72 Iran 31.3
73 Qatar 29.4
73 Sudan 29.4
74 Kuwait 28.8
75 Yemen 26.9
76 West Bank and Gaza 26.3

According to the report, there are 20 economies in the world where women still have half or fewer of the legal economic rights of men.

Under Taliban rule, for example, women in Afghanistan have limited access to education and work. In the Gaza Strip, women must have the permission of a male guardian to travel.

Yet, some differences are also seen in developed countries.

In the U.S, women still earn an average of about 82 cents for each dollar earned by men, and the gap across many countries in Europe is similar. Meanwhile, women are represented in just 23% of seats in national parliaments globally, and make up just 13% of agricultural landholders.

The Shadow Pandemic

COVID-19 has exacerbated existing inequalities that disadvantage girls and women, including barriers to attend school and maintain jobs, according to the United Nations.

In fact, new research shows that the sectors that have been most affected by the pandemic so far are those with high levels of women workers, including the restaurant and hospitality business, as well as the travel sector.

While leaders debate recovery in a post-pandemic world, rights equality remains a central topic for social and economic development.

The post Visualizing Women’s Economic Rights Around the World appeared first on Visual Capitalist.

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